Raiders Draft Position Targets: Wide Receiver

We’ve heard plenty about the Big 3: Jerry Jeudy, CeeDee Lamb, and Henry Ruggs III, but could the Raiders draft other impact WRs later in the draft?


Out of all of the positions of need for the Las Vegas Raiders draft this year, wide receiver is by far the most discussed, over-analyzed and argued. While we all have our own biases as to which of the Big 3 is better, let’s take a look at other wideouts that could help the Raiders draft haul improve in later rounds as well.

Round 1 – Jerry Jeudy, Alabama

Pros:     

  • Jeudy is the best route runner I have ever seen in college. He can stop on a dime and give you 11 cents change back.
  • Speed in and out of routes is the reason Jeudy can get separation on any route he runs
  • His separation ability leads to his ability for YAC
  • Blocking is mandatory at Alabama and Jeudy isn’t scared to finish blocks down the field.

Cons:    

  • Drops have been a minor issue for Jeudy at Alabama.  It’s not a problem like some prospects but I had to put something here

Last year I was all in on DK Metcalf and I had him as my WR1 and still can’t believe he was a 2nd round pick. That said, Jeudy would have been WR1 for me last year, he is this year, and, with all due respect to Ja’Marr Chase Jeudy, would be my WR1 next year. He has a chance to be a foundational piece to any offense.

Round 3 – Van Jefferson, Florida

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY – SEPTEMBER 14: Van Jefferson #12 of the Florida Gators runs with the ball against the Kentucky Wildcats at Commonwealth Stadium on September 14, 2019 in Lexington, Kentucky. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

Pros:     

  • Route running is probably second only to Jeudy in this years draft.
  • Great hands that allow him to make tough contested catches.
  • Competitiveness is Jefferson’s middle name. This guy is a dog and he will fight for everything in his area.

Cons:    

  • Lack of top-end speed is an issue for Jefferson.
  • Blocking isn’t a priority in his game yet.
  • Slot may be his only position so lack of position flexibility could be an issue.

Van Jefferson has a little Hunter Renfrow in him. He will get separation by his route running and can catch anything thrown his way. He will need to be in a system that uses his skills since he will be limited in his position flexibility.

Round 4 – Quartney Davis, Texas A&M

Davis could be a gem if used in the right situations but isn’t a speed guy.

Pros:     

  • Excellent footwork is Davis’s best trait.
  • Makes his money in the middle of the field, not scared to take a hit to make a play.
  • Great football IQ allows him to find holes in zones with ease.

Cons:    

  • Lack of deep speed will be an issue for Davis.
  • Not a downfield threat, more of a middle of the field zone buster.
  • Smaller wingspan will cut down on his catch radius making for too many contested catches.

Davis profiles as a slot receiver that can be used on third-and-long to break up a zone. Excellent footwork will make up for a lack of top end speed in shorter routes but becomes a liability in a downfield offense.

Round 5 – Antonio Gandy-Golden, Liberty

Pros:     

  • At 6-foot-4, 222 pounds Gandy Golden is a physical freak.
  • Good hands with a great catch radius allow Gandy Golden to come down with the football.
  • Tracking the ball in the air is one of his best skills. 

Cons:    

  • Very small route tree ran in college.
  • Can get stuffed in press-man coverage which leads to delayed routes.
  • Not the best at breaking tackles goes down on the first contact way too often.

A small school prospect that has the physical traits to be a great gamble late in the draft, Gandy-Golden could be that one-in-a-million dream come true.  If you can expand his route tree you could find a diamond in the rough. I don’t believe he will ever be a WR1, but with some time could become a very good position receiver in the league.